Colombian Black Bean Stew

Colombian black bean stew is an easy-to-make delicious protein-rich stew. It is also very affordable and all its ingredients are relatively easy to source. This dish is traditionally non-vegan and is served as part of a bandeja paisa, which is a platter dish featuring a variety of foods – beans cooked with meats, white rice, plantains, avocado slices, chilli sauce or flakes,  fried eggs and a variety of other meats.

Although this stew is traditionally non-vegan. We are sharing our vegan version of it with you. Trust us, it is very flavoursome and it will become a go-to meal for you on both the days you have the time and energy to cook and when you don’t.

Without further ado, here’s our recipe.

¡Buen Provecho!

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Julienned Aubergines (Eggplants)

This is an absolutely delicious and versatile dish. It also is extremely easy to make! Therefore, it can be your go-to for a healthy delicious meal any day and at any time.

We are aware that the term “julienne” is unfamiliar to a lot of home cooks. Some people think it is related to the name, Julian, and that confused them even more! Julienning is a method of cutting by which you slice fruits or vegetables into short thin strips. It takes a lot of practice to do this quickly. However, once you master it, it’s a skill you will love to show off!

To julienne aubergines, first, you will cut the top and bottom of an aubergine then slice it in half, lay the cut side on your chopping board and slice down the length of the aubergine to create thin strips. Next, you will lay the slices on their side with each slice overlapping the one next to it and you will make slices again to ake matchstick-like pieces. If the aubergine’s really tall, just cut the pieces in half while they’re stacked together.

Aubergines are very nutrient-dense. They contain good amounts of protein, fibre, vitamin A, pyridoxamine (vitamin B6), folate (vitamin B9), vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, and potassium as well as other nutrients such as thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), vitamin E, choline, copper, phosphorus and zinc. Therefore, although so simple, this dish is really healthy. You can find more about the roles of the nutrients mentioned in our Nutrient Index.

Without further ado, here’s our Julienned Aubergine Recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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Vegan Challah Bread

Challah bread is a beautiful, shiny, delicious and slightly sweet Jewish braided bread. Traditionally, this bread is made with enriched dough. This means that the dough contains eggs, and for Israeli challah, oil, which add to its taste, texture and appearance. Therefore, conventionally made challah bread is not vegan (to the dismay of those who have tried it before) although unlike European enriched doughs, it is parve (it does not contain dairy).

Today, we are going to share our tried and tested delicious challah bread recipe with you. It is beautiful, delectable, flavoursome and will be the perfect addition to your dining table at any time of the day. This is the one bread recipe that will have your friends and family thinking you are a pro-baker and asking for you to make bread especially for them.

We will not keep you away from this recipe much longer. So, here’s our vegan challah bread recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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Black Bean Pasta

Black bean noodle meets stir-fried pasta – that’s what our black bean pasta is like. It doesn’t contain a chunjang (fermented black bean paste) like the traditional Korean-Chinese black bean noodles, jjajangmyeon. However, in place of chunjang, it is made using a blend of black beans, garlic, ginger and other flavour enhancing ingredients. This blend is used to stir fry vegetables (keeping the recipe low-fat) then the rest of it is tossed with pasta to make a delicious, umami, flavoursome meal.

The black beans in this recipe are great sources of nutrients such as protein, fibre, thiamin (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), niacin (vitamin B-3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), folate (vitamin B-9), calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, omega fatty acids, phosphorus, potassium, selenium and zinc. Although black beans are high in carbohydrates they have a lower glycemic index than a lot of other high carb foods. They also aid in minimising the risk and effects of diabetes by reducing the spike in blood sugar levels from consuming food. You can find more information about the benefits of the nutrients found in black beans in our Nutrient Index.

Without further ado, here’s our black bean pasta recipe!

Bon Appétit!

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Pulled “Pork” Pasta

Pulled ‘pork’ pasta is both an aesthetically pleasing and delicious meal. By tweaking our recipe for the pulled “pork,” you can make vegan versions of shredded chicken and shredded duck.

The question on your mind right now is probably, “what could have been used to make the pulled pork?” Initially, you might have thought of tofu or seitan, but for this recipe, that’s not the case. Today, we are going to introduce you to a new pantry ingredient – jackfruit!

Whenever we’ve mentioned jackfruit to people, we receive comments like, “a fruit named jack?” or “how can you make something so savoury with a fruit which is sweet?” Well, although jackfruit is a bright yellow-orange, bubblegum tasting fruit, when it’s young/unripe it’s a rather beige colour and savoury, although it might be possible to get a hint of a sweet undertone to its flavour when eaten uncooked. Young jackfruit is excellent at holding the flavour of whatever it is seasoned/cooked with and is so fibrous that it can easily be pulled or shredded to mimic the texture and consistency of pulled and shredded meats.

Jackfruit contains good amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamine (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), niacin (vitamin B-3), pyridoxamine (vitamin B-6,) folate (vitamin B-9), fibre, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium zinc, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and even protein. You can find more information on the roles of these nutrients in the body in our Nutrient Index.

So, without further ado, here’s our pulled “pork” pasta recipe!

Bon Appétit!

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Seitan Recipe

Seitan is a vegan meat substitute that has been growing in popularity over the years. It is so versatile that nowadays, it is used to make vegan beef, fried chicken, ham slices, sausage, minced meat and so on. Apart from its versatility, seitan is also a great source of protein and various minerals, such as iron, selenium, calcium, phosphorus and copper.

What is seitan made from? Seitan is a product of the vital wheat gluten, which is the pure protein found in wheat flour. However, unlike wheat flour, seitan is low in carbohydrates and mostly does not contain starch. Seitan is made by hydrating this protein with a range of seasonings then cooking in a way specific to the final product desired. In our opinion, this meat substitute is more similar to both the appearance and texture of meat.

Without further ado, here’s one of our delicious seitan recipes!

Bon Appetit!
Sponsored by: At His Feet Devotionals, who funded the making of this recipe.
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Coconut Dhal with Flatbread

Dhal is the perfect comfort food for any time of the day. It is flavoursome, nutritious and, as we love to describe it, a hug in a bowl. It can be eaten with rice, but we prefer to eat it with freshly made flatbread.

The main ingredient in a bowl of dhal is lentils or split peas, those are basically what the term, “dhal” means. Split peas and lentils both contain good amounts of  protein, vitamin A, thiamin (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), niacin (vitamin B-4), pantothenic acid (vitamin-B-5), pyridoxamine (vitamin B-6), folate (vitamin B-9), cobalamin (vitamin B-12), choline, vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, dietary fibre and omega fatty acids. These are only a few of the nutrients our coconut dhal contains. Their descriptions and benefits can be found in our Nutrient Index.

We hope you enjoy our dhal recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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