New Year’s Treats: Berliner (Krapfen/Pfannkuchen)


Berliner, also known as Krapfen and Pfannkuchen, is a rather doughnut-like German treat usually eaten during Silvester (New Year’s Eve) as well as through the Karneval holidays. It is made by deep-frying a sweet enriched dough, filling it with jam or marmalade through a single hole and topping it with powdered sugar, rum-flavoured sugar or granulated sugar. For a party joke or roulette-like game, you can full some of the Berliners with mustard. Just a few though – you won’t want to waste a lot of these delicious Beliners!

We know that this is our second relatively unhealthy dish we have shared this week, but we believe that it’s okay to treat yourself once in a while and this is an easy and delicious way to do so. Don’t worry, we’ll get back to our healthier (yet, so delicious) recipes after this one.

If you don’t have a piping bag or piping tip, you can still follow this recipe. We have a few tricks we’ll share with you so you can fill your Berliners without having to purchase piping equipment.

Guten Appetit!

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New Year’s Treats: Oliebollen


In English, Oliebollen does not sound particularly appetising but trust me, these oil balls are pretty good!

These deep-fried dough balls are a staple in the Netherlands (its place of origin) around New Year’s. They are rather crisp on the outside. However, the inside is soft, fluffy and sweet. This sweetness mainly comes from the raisins and chopped apples mixed into the sticky batter-like dough which forms the oliebollen.

Traditionally, Oliebollen as it contains eggs and dairy. Nonetheless, we have veganised this recipe to make it suitable for those with dietary requirements or preferences which exclude dairy and eggs. For a gluten-free recipe, just substitute the flour with an equal amount of gluten-free all-purpose flour.

This recipe is not particularly healthy, but every now and then we ought to be able to treat ourselves and our guests.

We hope you enjoy our vegan oliebollen recipe!

Eet Ze!

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12 Days of Christmas: Christmas Pudding


Christmas pudding is a delicious British steamed dessert consisting of fried fruits, rum or brandy, citrus zest and a few other ingredients. It is a great dessert that is often made a year before it is actually eaten and also often “fed” during that period by pouring some rum or brandy over it every few days or every month. This pudding looks like a cake, but trust us, it’s steamed, not baked.

Our recipe tastes great on the day it is made and does not require ageing or feeding although some might still choose to do those. It is a perfect representation of the flavours of Christmas on a plate and is sure to amaze your dinner guests, not just by its appearance, but by the traditional way it tends to be brought out/presented which is to set the pudding on fire by pouring flaming alcohol over it in a rather dark (but not pitch black) room. Don’t worry, the fire dies out on its own within 30 seconds.

For those who want to make or serve a Christmas pudding void of alcohol, replace the rum in this recipe with either freshly made apple juice or black tea. Alternatively, you can opt to not soak the dried fruits in anything. However, their texture and appearance are more appealing after soaking.

This recipe was kept nut-free for those who might be allergic. If you are a fan of nuts and none of your guests are allergic to nuts, you can add about 40g of chopped blanched almonds to your pudding mix.

Without further ado, here’s our vegan Christmas Pudding recipe!

Bon Appétit!

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12 Days of Christmas: Apple-Pear Trifle


This apple-pear trifle was not intentionally made. It is the beautiful and absolutely delicious outcome of multiple failed processes whilst trying to test out the recipe for a different dessert idea. It’s the best accident we have ever made and it turned out so good we made multiple portions to serve with people who equally loved it and wanted the recipe ASAP! I guess it’s good that we noted everything we did when trying to figure out a new recipe through working with the failed parts of our initial recipe.

Traditionally, trifles are made with a base of fruit and sponge cake fingers which are suspended in jelly and topped with layers of custard, whipped cream and fresh fruit. However, for this recipe, we are taking a more modern approach to trifles. Our trifle consists of alternating layers of deliciously stewed apple-pear mixture and luscious coconut custard. It is then topped off with crushed meringue pieces which add another element of flavour and colour to the dessert.

This is the traditional trifle’s lighter cousin. We hope you know you’ll enjoy making and eating it.

Bon Appétit!

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12 Days of Christmas: Fruit Cake


Fruit cakes are present at various Christmas events across the globe. However, they are made with slight variances. For example, in some cultures, walnuts, and other nuts, are added to the cake batter while in others, candied peel, citrus zests and/or orange juice, black tea, brandy or rum are added to the batter.

This fruit cake recipe makes a delicious cake. However, it also serves as a base for any vegan fruit cake. You can customise it by adding extra ingredients to it to make it more suited to your cultural or creative preferences. We should note that if you add any additional liquids to the recipe, you should reduce that amount from the quantity of almond milk used.

The amount of raisins in this recipe is the amount to keep this cake sweet, but not overpoweringly sweet. Therefore, it is more suitable or those who do not enjoy very sweet treats. However, the salted caramel sauce will be rather sweet so, for those who prefer to avoid very sweet treats you can omit the sauce.

We hope you enjoy this recipe and it helps you make the perfect fruit cake for your Christmas desserts.

Bon Appétit! Continue reading “12 Days of Christmas: Fruit Cake”