12 Days of Christmas: British Christmas Dinner


Christmas Dinners tend to be the highlight of a lot of people’s years in the United Kingdom. Every Christmas dinner features a roast meat centrepiece which is usually poultry, but nowadays, other meats are included such as beef and pork. Served alongside the roast are roast potatoes, carrots, parsnips, brussels sprouts, stuffing, pigs in a blanket, Yorkshire pudding and gravy.

As we have already shared out roast seitan and gravy with you, for day 4, we are going to share our fluffy roast potato, carrot and onion-herb stuffing recipes with you. They are delicious and pair well together through a linking of infused oil flavours.

As a warning to our American readers, British stuffing is very different from American stuffing. With that said, if you try our stuffing recipe, do so without the stuffing you are more familiar with in mind.

Bon Appétit!

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12 Days of Christmas: Roast Seitan


The centrepiece of most Christmas dinners is roast meat. For Day 3 of our 12 Days of Christmas, we will be sharing our roast seitan recipe with you. It is packed with flavour and glazed with a simple brown sugar glaze.

This roast seitan takes about 2hrs to make. However, 92% of that time is cooking-time which means that you won’t have to actively be in the kitchen. Therefore, this seitan is rather easy to make and not time-consuming while still being so delicious.

This seitan can be served with our Mashed Potatoes and Creamy Mushroom Gravy and is also linked to tomorrow’s recipe which will be of a British Christmas Dinner.

Bon Appétit!

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12 Days of Christmas: Mashed Potatoes with a Creamy Mushroom Gravy


American Christmas dinners usually consist of roasted root vegetables, some roast meat, mashed potatoes and gravy. Today, we’re sharing our delicious mashed potato and gravy recipe with you. These are not your ordinary mash and gravy as we have infused the mash with the flavours of onions and garlic and thickened the gravy using a mixture of mushrooms and rice which have been added to a vegetable stock seasoned to perfection.

Although we are just sharing the mash and gravy recipes with you today, we will be sharing our flavoursome roast seitan recipe with you tomorrow followed by a British Christmas dinner which will feature other elements found in American Christmas dinners alongside those solely found in British Christmas dinners.

Let us know your thoughts if you try any of these recipes.

Bon Appétit!

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Tomato One Pot Pasta


One-pot pasta dishes are delicious lifesavers. You literally just have to chuck a sauce, optional bunch of veggies, herbs and spices into a pot, add some pasta and freshly boiled water then let it cook. No draining is needed as the pasta absorbs all of the water and flavours in the pot.

Any store-bought pasta can be used. However, if you have a little extra time, you can make a simple marinara sauce which you can use instead.

This recipe can easily be customised using a range of sauces, spices, pasta shapes and additional ingredients in order to make delicious meals without spending a lot of time in the kitchen or fussing over the process of cooking.

Without further ado, here is this one-pot pasta recipe!

Bon Appétit!

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Pad Thai Ramen Soup by Plantifully Based


This Pad Thai Ramen Soup recipe is a featured recipe developed by Francesca of Plantifully Based and PlantifullyBasedBlog.com.

This soup is a fusion dish that plays off the flavours of Pad Thai. Traditionally, Pad Thai contains fish sauce. As this dish is vegan, in its place, soy sauce is used in order to provide a nice umami flavour. However, you can always substitute that with a vegan fish sauce.

In relation to heat levels, authentically, Thai chillies would be used. However, for this recipe, sriracha was used to make the process of cooking and controlling the heat level this easier.

As for common allergens, in order to make this dish soy-free, replace the soy sauce with coconut aminos and exclude the tofu. To make the dish gluten-free, substitute the soy sauce for tamari or coconut aminos and use gluten-free ramen. With regards to making the dish nut-free, just leave out the peanuts.

Without further ado, here’s Francesca’s Pad Thai Soup recipe!

Bon Appétit!

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Veganising Gordon Ramsay – Meatballs


Gordon Ramsay is the chef vegans love to hate. Actually, he’s more like the chef vegans love to laugh at. Why? Well, he’s an incredible chef who is great at what he does, but he’s also not a fan of vegans. Due to this….abhorrence of vegans, he publically makes some….interesting remarks mocking vegans or vegan dishes without even tasting them, but then…..BUT THEN, he goes on to add a vegan roast to his Bread St. Kitchen menu and tells the ever-outspoken vegan-hating Piers Morgan to “get with the times,” with some cussing, of course, when Mr. Morgan described the look of his new roast as utterly revolting.

ANYWAY, we are digressing. This post is to share a vegan version of Gordon Ramsay’s meatballs with you. We are just replacing the non-vegan ingredients in his meatballs with vegan substitutes (which we will suggest or provide recipes for). As we’re not actually using meat, the taste of the final product will be a bit different. However, it’s still really delicious, soft and full of texture. As you will notice when making these meatballs, the binder will be the breadcrumbs mixed with milk as opposed to a traditional egg binder or more common vegan flax/chia “egg” binder. This allows for a lighter meatball that still holds its shape.

‘Veganising Gordon Ramsay’ is be a series in which we will veganise a number of Gordon Ramsay’s recipes so those who enjoy(ed) watching him cook could try out his recipes without non-vegan ingredients or, if they haven’t completely eliminated animal (by-)products from their diet, in a way that that they feel more comfortable occasionally eating it.

So, without further ado, here’s our vegan version of Gordon’s Meatballs!

Bon appétit!

p.s He says they’re freezable and he defrosts them to cook with! His words, not ours. He’s promoting freezer-use for meals. There’s video evidence!

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Colombian Black Bean Stew


Colombian black bean stew is an easy-to-make delicious protein-rich stew. It is also very affordable and all its ingredients are relatively easy to source. This dish is traditionally non-vegan and is served as part of a bandeja paisa, which is a platter dish featuring a variety of foods – beans cooked with meats, white rice, plantains, avocado slices, chilli sauce or flakes,  fried eggs and a variety of other meats.

Although this stew is traditionally non-vegan. We are sharing our vegan version of it with you. Trust us, it is very flavoursome and it will become a go-to meal for you on both the days you have the time and energy to cook and when you don’t.

Without further ado, here’s our recipe.

¡Buen Provecho!

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Julienned Aubergines (Eggplants)


This is an absolutely delicious and versatile dish. It also is extremely easy to make! Therefore, it can be your go-to for a healthy delicious meal any day and at any time.

We are aware that the term “julienne” is unfamiliar to a lot of home cooks. Some people think it is related to the name, Julian, and that confused them even more! Julienning is a method of cutting by which you slice fruits or vegetables into short thin strips. It takes a lot of practice to do this quickly. However, once you master it, it’s a skill you will love to show off!

To julienne aubergines, first, you will cut the top and bottom of an aubergine then slice it in half, lay the cut side on your chopping board and slice down the length of the aubergine to create thin strips. Next, you will lay the slices on their side with each slice overlapping the one next to it and you will make slices again to ake matchstick-like pieces. If the aubergine’s really tall, just cut the pieces in half while they’re stacked together.

Aubergines are very nutrient-dense. They contain good amounts of protein, fibre, vitamin A, pyridoxamine (vitamin B6), folate (vitamin B9), vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, and potassium as well as other nutrients such as thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), vitamin E, choline, copper, phosphorus and zinc. Therefore, although so simple, this dish is really healthy. You can find more about the roles of the nutrients mentioned in our Nutrient Index.

Without further ado, here’s our Julienned Aubergine Recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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Mamma Mehta’s Channa Masala


We did not develop this recipe, but we have tried making it and can assure you that it was delicious! It was sent to our founder, Samantha, by her friend’s mother who we have been dubbed as ‘Mamma Mehta’. So all credits for this recipe go to her.

This channa masala is easy to make, takes just about 30mins to cook, and tastes absolutely delightful. It is both nutritious and comforting. As expected on this site, all the ingredients are easy to source at conventional supermarkets and at smaller international food shops.

Without further ado, here’s Mamma Mehta’s Channa Masala recipe!

Bon Appétit!

Bhojan kaa aanand lijiye!

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Buddha Bowl (“Balanced Meals In A Bowl”)


fBuddha bowls are a collection of various, usually vegan or vegetarian, meals foods served together in a wide pasta bowl or high-rimmed plate. They usually consist of grains, a protein source, a fat source, cooked vegetables and raw vegetables. Some times, they also include a bit of a sauce. Basically, they are balanced meals in a bowl.

Buddha bowls are not something we created. They have been growing in popularity, especially in the plant-based community, since 2013. According to the author of Buddha’s Diet, Zen priest, Dan Zigmond, the name is derived from the act of Buddha walking through the streets with his bowl and eating whatever the local people would place in his bowl as alms.

We would like to share a simple, yet very nutritious recipe for a Buddha bowl with you today. No measurements are given as it’s expected to be made to taste and with as much or as little of each ingredient as you would like.

Bon Appétit! Continue reading “Buddha Bowl (“Balanced Meals In A Bowl”)”