Know Your Milk: Your Guide to Plant Milks

Over the years, people have become more aware of the negative environmental, health and animal welfare impacts of the dairy industry and dairy consumption. This has lead to more research into alternatives for dairy products such as beverages consumed for centuries that look or perform similarly to dairy for particular uses. These beverages include the coconut milk used in Asian curries, soy milk, which has been produced and used in China for the last 7 centuries and tiger nut milk and rice milk which have been used in the western and northern parts of Africa, and in Spain, to make kuunu aya, horchata de chufa and horchata de arroz before 1000AD. As a matter of fact, the white liquid formed from blending grains, tubers, seeds and some fruits with water has been referred to as “milk” for the last 8 centuries!

Whether you are allergic to dairy, lactose-intolerant, vegan or just looking to reduce your consumption of animal products/by-products, there is a plant milk for you. Some of these kinds of milk compare closely with the nutritional value of dairy, without the potential negative health effects, while others contain nutrients that can not be found in dairy making them healthier or more suitable for certain purposes.

In this article, we are going to introduce you to a few plant milks to give you a better idea of what they are and make it a bit easier for you to find the most suitable milk for you.

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Buddha Bowl

Buddha bowls are a collection of various, usually vegan or vegetarian, meals foods served together in a wide pasta bowl or high-rimmed plate. They usually consist of grains, a protein source, a fat source, cooked vegetables and raw vegetables. Some times, they also include a bit of a sauce. Basically, they are balanced meals in a bowl.

Buddha bowls are not something we created. They have been growing in popularity, especially in the plant-based community, since 2013. According to the author of Buddha’s Diet, Zen priest, Dan Zigmond, the name is derived from the act of Buddha walking through the streets with his bowl and eating whatever the local people would place in his bowl as alms.

We would like to share a simple, yet very nutritious recipe for a Buddha bowl with you today. No measurements are given as it’s expected to be made to taste and with as much or as little of each ingredient as you would like.

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Seitan Recipe

Seitan is a vegan meat substitute that has been growing in popularity over the years. It is so versatile that nowadays, it is used to make vegan beef, fried chicken, ham slices, sausage, minced meat and so on. Apart from its versatility, seitan is also a great source of protein and various minerals, such as iron, selenium, calcium, phosphorus and copper.

What is seitan made from? Seitan is a product of the vital wheat gluten, which is the pure protein found in wheat flour. However, unlike wheat flour, seitan is low in carbohydrates and mostly does not contain starch. Seitan is made by hydrating this protein with a range of seasonings then cooking in a way specific to the final product desired. In our opinion, this meat substitute is more similar to both the appearance and texture of meat.

Without further ado, here’s one of our delicious seitan recipes!

Bon Appetit!
Sponsored by: At His Feet Devotionals, who funded the making of this recipe.
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Coconut Dhal with Flatbread

Dhal is the perfect comfort food for any time of the day. It is flavoursome, nutritious and, as we love to describe it, a hug in a bowl. It can be eaten with rice, but we prefer to eat it with freshly made flatbread.

The main ingredient in a bowl of dhal is lentils or split peas, those are basically what the term, “dhal” means. Split peas and lentils both contain good amounts of  protein, vitamin A, thiamin (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), niacin (vitamin B-4), pantothenic acid (vitamin-B-5), pyridoxamine (vitamin B-6), folate (vitamin B-9), cobalamin (vitamin B-12), choline, vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, dietary fibre and omega fatty acids. These are only a few of the nutrients our coconut dhal contains. Their descriptions and benefits can be found in our Nutrient Index.

We hope you enjoy our dhal recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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