Julienned Aubergines (Eggplants)


This is an absolutely delicious and versatile dish. It also is extremely easy to make! Therefore, it can be your go-to for a healthy delicious meal any day and at any time.

We are aware that the term “julienne” is unfamiliar to a lot of home cooks. Some people think it is related to the name, Julian, and that confused them even more! Julienning is a method of cutting by which you slice fruits or vegetables into short thin strips. It takes a lot of practice to do this quickly. However, once you master it, it’s a skill you will love to show off!

To julienne aubergines, first, you will cut the top and bottom of an aubergine then slice it in half, lay the cut side on your chopping board and slice down the length of the aubergine to create thin strips. Next, you will lay the slices on their side with each slice overlapping the one next to it and you will make slices again to ake matchstick-like pieces. If the aubergine’s really tall, just cut the pieces in half while they’re stacked together.

Aubergines are very nutrient-dense. They contain good amounts of protein, fibre, vitamin A, pyridoxamine (vitamin B6), folate (vitamin B9), vitamin C, vitamin K, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, and potassium as well as other nutrients such as thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), vitamin E, choline, copper, phosphorus and zinc. Therefore, although so simple, this dish is really healthy. You can find more about the roles of the nutrients mentioned in our Nutrient Index.

Without further ado, here’s our Julienned Aubergine Recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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Pulled “Pork” Pasta


Pulled ‘pork’ pasta is both an aesthetically pleasing and delicious meal. By tweaking our recipe for the pulled “pork,” you can make vegan versions of shredded chicken and shredded duck.

The question on your mind right now is probably, “what could have been used to make the pulled pork?” Initially, you might have thought of tofu or seitan, but for this recipe, that’s not the case. Today, we are going to introduce you to a new pantry ingredient – jackfruit!

Whenever we’ve mentioned jackfruit to people, we receive comments like, “a fruit named jack?” or “how can you make something so savoury with a fruit which is sweet?” Well, although jackfruit is a bright yellow-orange, bubblegum tasting fruit, when it’s young/unripe it’s a rather beige colour and savoury, although it might be possible to get a hint of a sweet undertone to its flavour when eaten uncooked. Young jackfruit is excellent at holding the flavour of whatever it is seasoned/cooked with and is so fibrous that it can easily be pulled or shredded to mimic the texture and consistency of pulled and shredded meats.

Jackfruit contains good amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamine (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), niacin (vitamin B-3), pyridoxamine (vitamin B-6,) folate (vitamin B-9), fibre, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium zinc, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and even protein. You can find more information on the roles of these nutrients in the body in our Nutrient Index.

So, without further ado, here’s our pulled “pork” pasta recipe!

Bon Appétit!

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