Veganising Gordon Ramsay – Meatballs


Gordon Ramsay is the chef vegans love to hate. Actually, he’s more like the chef vegans love to laugh at. Why? Well, he’s an incredible chef who is great at what he does, but he’s also not a fan of vegans. Due to this….abhorrence of vegans, he publically makes some….interesting remarks mocking vegans or vegan dishes without even tasting them, but then…..BUT THEN, he goes on to add a vegan roast to his Bread St. Kitchen menu and tells the ever-outspoken vegan-hating Piers Morgan to “get with the times,” with some cussing, of course, when Mr. Morgan described the look of his new roast as utterly revolting.

ANYWAY, we are digressing. This post is to share a vegan version of Gordon Ramsay’s meatballs with you. We are just replacing the non-vegan ingredients in his meatballs with vegan substitutes (which we will suggest or provide recipes for). As we’re not actually using meat, the taste of the final product will be a bit different. However, it’s still really delicious, soft and full of texture. As you will notice when making these meatballs, the binder will be the breadcrumbs mixed with milk as opposed to a traditional egg binder or more common vegan flax/chia “egg” binder. This allows for a lighter meatball that still holds its shape.

‘Veganising Gordon Ramsay’ is be a series in which we will veganise a number of Gordon Ramsay’s recipes so those who enjoy(ed) watching him cook could try out his recipes without non-vegan ingredients or, if they haven’t completely eliminated animal (by-)products from their diet, in a way that that they feel more comfortable occasionally eating it.

So, without further ado, here’s our vegan version of Gordon’s Meatballs!

Bon appétit!

p.s He says they’re freezable and he defrosts them to cook with! His words, not ours. He’s promoting freezer-use for meals. There’s video evidence!

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Ladies’ Finger Tomato Sauce


Ladies’ finger tomato sauce is a delicious, easy to make and nutritious sauce which you can serve alongside rice, over potatoes or even with pasta! This dish is not slimy like okra  (ladies’ finger) dishes can tend to be. This is due to the acidity of the tomatoes added to the dish, which naturally reduce the amount of slime the okra releases. The dish is also very minimally agitated using utensils in order to not promote the release of a lot of slime from the okra.

Okra is a pod which is high is a great source of nutrients such as vitamin C, vitamin K and manganese. It also contains some protein, vitamin A, thiamin (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), niacin (vitamin B-3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), folate (vitamin B-9), vitamin E, choline, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, a little omega-6 fatty acid, phosphorus, potassium and zinc. The other ingredients in this recipe further enhance the nutritional value of the final dish making it nutritious while still offering a tasty experience. You can find more about the roles of the aforementioned nutrients in our Nutrient Index.

Without further ado, here’s our Ladies’ Finger Tomato Sauce recipe.

Bon Appétit!

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Veganising Tia Mowry – Slow Cooker Chilli


Everyone loves Tia Mowry-Hardrict. Her personality, talent, and skills are impeccable. If you watch Tia Mowry’s Quick Fix, you might have wanted to give a few of her recipes a try. If you’re cutting down on your animal product and by-product intake or you’ve completely eliminated those ingredients from your diet, you can still try Tia’s recipe with a few tweaks here and there.

In this series – Veganising Tia Mowry, we will be sharing vegan versions of Tia’s recipes with you and, in the process, teaching you how you can make non-vegan recipes vegan. We will

Let’s get started and do a “Quick Veganising” of Tia Mowry’s Quick Fix Slow Cooker Chilli.

Bon Appetite!

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Know Your Milk: Your Guide to Plant Milks


Over the years, people have become more aware of the negative environmental, health and animal welfare impacts of the dairy industry and dairy consumption. This has lead to more research into alternatives for dairy products such as beverages consumed for centuries that look or perform similarly to dairy for particular uses. These beverages include the coconut milk used in Asian curries, soy milk, which has been produced and used in China for the last 7 centuries and tiger nut milk and rice milk which have been used in the western and northern parts of Africa, and in Spain, to make kuunu aya, horchata de chufa and horchata de arroz before 1000AD. As a matter of fact, the white liquid formed from blending grains, tubers, seeds and some fruits with water has been referred to as “milk” for the last 8 centuries!

Whether you are allergic to dairy, lactose-intolerant, vegan or just looking to reduce your consumption of animal products/by-products, there is a plant milk for you. Some of these kinds of milk compare closely with the nutritional value of dairy, without the potential negative health effects, while others contain nutrients that can not be found in dairy making them healthier or more suitable for certain purposes.

In this article, we are going to introduce you to a few plant milks to give you a better idea of what they are and make it a bit easier for you to find the most suitable milk for you.

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Family Acceptance


When I went vegetarian, no one in my family could understand it. They were (and 99% still are) huge meat eaters and all they seemed to know was that meat was the healthiest thing to eat. Every day at the dinner table, someone would joke around about vegetarianism or pick on me till the point that I saw it as bullying and I actually dreaded eating with family. I did not find one bit of what they had to say funny or appropriate. I did not and still do not like when people in my family try to convince me to eat meat and most of all, I do not like it when they try to coerce me into eating a dairy product or they slip dairy into things they give to me. All I want is for everyone in my family to accept how I choose to eat, especially as I am in my 20s (and stopped eating meat as a preteen).

Most vegans and vegetarians, unfortunately, have to go through this – the disapproval of their family, the scrutiny when eating around family (not when they cook for themselves), et cetera. It is rather heartbreaking, although those on the outside can’t seem to tell.

I can’t give you any advice that will suddenly make everything okay, sadly. However, I will advise you to be true to who you are, to try to enlighten your family and help them understand your decision. Sometimes, that does not help in any way, but it is still good to do. Just remember that being a militant vegan and vocally judging everything your family eats is only going to push them further away from you and make it harder for them to accept your decision.

Why did you go vegetarian/vegan?

I initially went vegetarian because I hate the taste of meat as mentioned on the About page. I moved towards a vegan lifestyle after I developed a dairy allergy and it got worse and more painful the older I got. This is a different reason from that of most plant-based eaters. Most people give up animal products due to a yearning to make a change, not just for their health, but for that of animals and the planet. I find that compassion to be such a beautiful reason to give up animal products. However, sadly, many people don’t see it that way.

It is important to let your family know why you made such a drastic change, whether they believe it or not. If you chose to change your lifestyle for one of the common reasons, you are at an advantage as there are resources out there to help you with explaining your decision to your family. You can show them movies such as What the Health, Forks Over Knives, Earthlings, Food Matters, Hungry for Change and Cowspiracy. You can ask them to read books such as The China Study, and The China Study Expanded. These resources can help you get your points across better and can help your family form an emotional connection with your decision. However, unfortunately, this does not always help.

What can you say to support your new lifestyle?

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